Using WebLogic Server Console to Monitor PeopleSoft Sessions

October 10, 2008 2 comments

This is Taken from PeopleBooks – PeopleTools 8.49.

TheWebLogic Server console can display a list of established HTTP sessions for that instance of the WebLogic Server. Session Monitoring is automatically enabled for WebLogic. These instructions describe how monitor the single server configuration of PIA. When in production, note that a multi server configuration would be used to perform these steps to the server instance that you intend to monitor, such as PIA1 or PIA2, or both.

  1. Start the PIA server.Start the PIA server either using startPIA.cmd(.sh) or, if installed as a Windows service, NET START peoplesoft-PIA.
  2. Log on to PeopleSoftLog on to your PeopleSoft application. If possible, log on from a couple different workstations using different PeopleSoft IDs. For the purpose of this test, do not log off.
  3. Log on to the WebLogic Server Administrative Console.In a new browser, access the WebLogic Server console at http://weblogichost:port/console and specify the WebLogic administrative ID you specified during the PIA installation. The default ID and password are system/password, respectively.
  4. Monitor established HTTP sessions for the PORTAL web application.On the left, use the following navigation to view the list of established HTTP sessions for the PORTAL web application:
    1. Click Deployments, and view the deployment list in the right hand window.
    2. Click PeopleSoft.
    3. Select the Control tab.
    4. Select the PORTAL application module, where the context root of the module is ‘/’.
    5. Select the Monitoring tab.
    6. Select the Sessions tab.

Note. You can customize the list of fields that you want to monitor using the Customize this table link.

Categories: PS Admin Tags:

BEA Tuxedo Commands & Utilities

September 22, 2008 Leave a comment

http://www.peoplesoftexpert.com/mediawiki/index.php/Bea_Tuxedo

The above link gives a list of BEA Tuxedo Commands and Utilities.

PeopleTools client installation Batch file

September 19, 2008 3 comments

To install PeopleTools client on individual machine, you may create a batch file with the folloiwng lines in it and execute it to create Peopletools Client.

@echo off
[PS_HOME]\bin\client\winx86\pscfg -clean -quiet
echo Setting up PeopleTools Environment
[PS_HOME]\bin\client\winx86\pscfg -import:[PS_HOME]\peoplesoft.cfg -setup -quiet

[PS_HOME] could be like C:\PSFT\FN88PRD\

peoplesoft.cfg is the configuration file.

PeopleSoft Project Management

September 15, 2008 2 comments

PeopleSoft Project: PeopleSoft Project is a temporary endeavour undertaken to create a unique peoplesoft software product. Installing PeopleSoft Payroll module is an example of peopleSoft project. This Payroll module will take care of the companies payroll related requirement.

Types of PeopleSoft Projects: Following are the types of Peoplesoft projects: 

  1. New Implementation: In this category, one or more new modules of PeopleSoft are installed, configured. A company could implement Payroll and Benefits Administration module to replace its legacy payroll system. Another company could implement General Ledger, Accounts paybles and Purchasing module to start a new accounting, purchasing and payables system.
  2. Upgrade & Patch application: PeopleSoft is improving its lines of software and keep releasing new versions. Along with the release of new versions, PeopleSoft may also stop supporting older versions. This makes all clients who have older versions need to upgrade the PeopleSoft system to newer versions. This also could involve just PeopleTools upgrade. The complexity of the project depends on two things, from which lower version to which higher version the upgrde is about and level of customization done to vanilla software.
  3. Custom Development Projects: PeopleSoft venilla software may not be adaquate for many clients, and obviously they need to customize the PeopleSoft to their requirement. Normally more custom developments happen in the area of reports, interfaces and conversion.  

 Project Life cycle:

 Methodology: 8steps methodology could suit almost all kinds of PeopleSoft projects.

  1. Initiation
  2. Planning
  3. Design & Development 
  4. Monitor and Control
  5. Testing and Training
  6. Deployment
  7. Post production support
  8. Close

8steps Methodology details: A exhaustive list of components of each step is given below.

Initiation

  • Project feasibility Study
  • Develop Project Charter
  • Develop Preliminary Project Scope statement

 Planning

  • Develop Project management plan
  • Scope Planning
  • Scope Definition
  • Create WBS
  • Cost Management Plan
  • Quality management plan
  • Staffing management plan
  • Communications plan
  • Risk management Plan
  • Procurement management plan
  • Activity Defnition
  • Activity Sequencing
  • Actiivty Resource estimating
  • Activity Duration estimating
  • Schedule development
  • Cost Estimation
  • Cost Budgeting
  • Quality Planning
  • Human Resource Planning
  • Communication Planning
  • Risk Identification
  • Qualitative Risk Analysis
  • Quanititative Risk Analysis
  • Risk Response Planning
  • Plan purchase and Acquisitions
  • Plan Contracting

 Design & Development

  • Direct and Manage Project Execution
  • Detailed design specification functional
  • Detailed design specification technical
  • Development of objects/code
  • Perform Quality Assurance
  • Acquire Project Team
  • Develop Project Team
  • Information Distribution
  • Request Seller responses
  • Select sellers (contract Management planning)
  • Schedule control 

 Monitor and control

  • Monitor and Control Project
  • Integrated Change control
  • Scope verification
  • Scope Control
  • Schedule control
  • Cost control
  • Perform Quality control
  • Manage Project Team
  • Performance reporting
  • Manage Stake holders
  • Risk Monitoring and control
  • Contract Administration 

Testing and Training

  • Unit testing
  • System testing
  • User Acceptance Testing
  • User training 

Deployment

  •  Deploy the product to production

Post production support

  • Post production support

Close

  • Close Project
  • Close Contract
  • Lessons learned documentation 

 

Related articles in other blogs:

Categories: PM Tags:

Log file in Application Engine

September 15, 2008 2 comments

A typical example of Log file creation in application engine using peoplecode is given below.

local File &Log_file;

&Log_file = GetFile(“c:\temp\logfilename.txt”, “W”, %FilePath_Absolute);

&Log_file.WriteLine(“Begin Process : ” | %Datetime);

&Log_file.close()

But if you have to use the same log file across the sections within an application engine, then
Declare the file as global in one of the initial step as given below.

Global File &Log_file;

&Log_file = GetFile(“c:\temp\logfilename.txt”, “W”, %FilePath_Absolute);
&Log_file.WriteLine(“Begin Process : ” | %Datetime);

Then in any following section’s peoplecode step, declare the global variable and start writing to the file.

Global File &Log_file;

&Log_file.WriteLine(“Write anything here”);

Don’t forget to close the log file at the end of application engine.

Global File &Log_file;

&Log_file.close()

SQL server database audit

September 14, 2008 Leave a comment

We had a requirement to audit any SQL actions a user executes on any table, by loggin into SQL Query Analyser. We used SQL profiler to create a script as given below. Using the script, we created a new procedure in master database with an automatic start-on-restart option turned on. Once we restart sql server, the audit process start writing to a file which can be opened from SQL profiler. This file starts a new file once it reaches the file size maximum limit defined in the script or whenever SQL Server is rebooted. You may modify this script based on your requirement.

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.dba_startup_audit  AS
— Create a Queue
declare @rc int
declare @TraceID int
declare @maxfilesize bigint
DECLARE @File NVARCHAR(100)
Declare @Year nvarchar(10)
Declare @Month nvarchar(10)
Declare @Day nvarchar(10)
Declare @Hour nvarchar(10)
Declare @Minute nvarchar(10)
set @Year = DATEPART(year,GETDATE())
set @Month = DATEPART(month,GETDATE())
set @Day = DATEPART(day, GETDATE())
set @Hour = DATEPART(hour, GETDATE())
set @Minute = DATEPART(minute, GETDATE())
SET @File = N’C:\temp\db_audit_trace’+@Year+@Month+@Day+@Hour+@Minute
set @maxfilesize = 10
exec @rc = sp_trace_create @TraceID output, 2, @File, @maxfilesize, NULL
if (@rc != 0) goto error

— Set the events
declare @on bit
set @on = 1
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 10, 35, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 9, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 35, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 12, 41, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 9, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 35, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 13, 41, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 9, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 35, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 14, 41, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 9, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 35, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 15, 41, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 9, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 35, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 17, 41, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 40, 35, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 41, 35, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 46, 34, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 47, 35, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 9, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 35, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 82, 41, @on

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 1, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 2, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 6, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 8, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 10, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 11, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 12, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 14, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 22, @on
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 104, 35, @on

— Set the Filters
declare @intfilter int
declare @bigintfilter bigint

exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’People%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’sqlmon.pl’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’SQL Profiler’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’SQLAgent%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’MS SQLEM%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’sqlsvr_collector.pl%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’sqlsvr_backup_collector.pl%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’ps_app_version_pop.pl%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 0, 7, N’SQLDMO%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 10, 1, 6, N’SQL Query Analyzer%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 1, 1, 6, N’Select%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 1, 1, 6, N’Insert%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 1, 1, 6, N’Update%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 1, 1, 6, N’Create%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 1, 1, 6, N’Drop%’
exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 1, 1, 6, N’Delete%’
–set @intfilter = 100
–exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 22, 0, 4, @intfilter
–exec sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 35, 1, 6, N’HR83FS’

— Set the trace status to start
exec sp_trace_setstatus @TraceID, 1
— display trace id for future references
select TraceID=@TraceID
goto finish
error:
select ErrorCode=@rc
finish:
GO
exec sp_procoption N’dba_startup_audit’, N’startup’, N’true’
GO

begin-footing – two different foot note in one SQC

September 14, 2008 1 comment

There was a need to put two different foot note in SQR Reports based on the page orientation (Landscape or Portrait). For this situation, we can creat one SQC using #if and PAGE_ORIENTATION variable defined in our standard setup01a.sqc, setup02a.sqc etc. The SQC lines are given below.

 #if {PAGE_ORIENTATION} = ‘PORTRAIT’
begin-footing 2
  print ‘Important Note: 1’ (1,1)
  !Add more lines as needed
end-footing
#else
    #if {PAGE_ORIENTATION} = ‘LANDSCAPE’
begin-footing 2
  print ‘Important Note: 2 ‘ (1,1) 
  !Add more lines as needed
end-footing
    #end-if
#end-if

This assumes that the main sqr report has included one of standard setup layout sqc like setup01.sqc or setup02.sqc which should have PAGE_ORIENTATION defined using #define.

Categories: SQR Tags: